Lost Beneath the Waves 1914-1918: Divers remembering the massive loss of life at sea during WWI

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Saturday, October 26, 2013

Lost Beneath the Waves 1914–1918 is a NAS initiative asking SCUBA divers around the world, whether recreational, professional, and technical or military, to mark the massive loss of life at sea during WWI.

Lost Beneath the Waves (LBTW) is a project funded entirely by donations. Please help and donate what you can via the The Big Give.

The project team is compiling an online Google calendar (available below) with WWI wrecks of all nations and invites diving groups to visit the sites of WWI loses as close to the anniversary of their sinking as possible between 2014 and 2018.

The NAS does not propose any structured format to this commemoration. Groups can participate as much or as little as they wish and can choose which losses they want to mark and how to commemorate them. However, all groups are asked to mark their respect with a minutes silence and perhaps to even place a wreath or flowers over the site.

Groups are asked to share their experience, observations and any research by uploading photographs, video clips and notes to the projects Facebook Page, Twitter Feed and YouTube Channel following their visit to the site. Martin Woodward, of the National Diving Centre at Stoney Cove will judge all videos posted on the YouTube site in 2014. Stoney Cove is generously supporting this NAS initiative and has provided a GoPro heri 3+ Black as a prize for the best video record of a commemorative event. As well as remembering those who lost their lives, this will enhance the historic record for these vessels 100 years after their loss.
Project images

And can also be found at:
https://www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=hvjukjv3nkp1nhr8ja2t545glc%40g...

The project has a YouTube Channel which will be dedicated to hosting short videos (10 minutes maximum) of trips and events; a Facebook page for groups to disseminate their activities and any research and, is also on Twitter. 

The NAS plans to arrange one such event each year on a site of our choosing – we will try and pick a range of vessel types (ships, submarines, merchant vessels, hospital ships) each year and also from a range of nationalities. These NAS events would act as case studies and would encourage other groups to arrange similar events. Subject to permission from the Royal Navy it is hoped that the first of these NAS events will be held on the 6th August 2014 and is planned to be over the site of HMS Amphion, which was the first Royal Navy loss of WWI, after striking a mine in the early hours of the 6th August 1914.

The project launches at the UK Dive Show in Birmingham in October 2013 in time for the 2014 diving season. We believe this project could be a great mark of respect by the dive community.

The NAS already has the support of many organisations that have offered to promote the project and would love to hear from others interested in participating. We are also very pleased to have the support of well-known divers, Monty Halls and Andy Torbet as project ambassadors helping to encourage others to take part in the initiative.

Lost Beneath the Waves 1914-1918 is supported by:
UNESCO, Professional Association of Diving Instructors, British Sub-Aqua Club, Sub-Aqua Association, Scuba Schools International, Technical Diving International, The ScubaTrust, Dive Ability, Deptherapy, NOAA (USA), The Underwater Research Society (Turkey), Sea Change Heritage Consultants, Flanders Heritage Agency, South West Maritime Archaeological Group (UK), The Joint Nautical Archaeology Policy Committee, Fjordr Limited, ProMare UK, Battle of the Atlantic Research and Expedition Group, Mr Monty Halls and Mr Andy Torbet.

If you would like to pledge support or any help to the Lost Beneath the Waves 1914-1918 please contact
Mark Beattie-Edwards, Programme Director
The Nautical Archaeology Society, Fort Cumberland, Portsmouth PO4 9LD, UK
Tel/Fax: +44(0)23 9281 8419 Email: mark@nauticalarchaeologysociety.org 

Rememberance

International: 
Yes
Area: 
England